Outreach

Photo credit: Andreas Freise

IPTA Education and Public Outreach

The IPTA is dedicated to educating all people about pulsars and gravitational wave astronomy and to inspiring the next generation of citizen and professional scientists and engineers.  We support the outreach efforts of our individual PTA members and provide a framework for cooperating on education and outreach projects on a global scale.  You can stay up-to-date with the latest IPTA news by following us on Facebook.

An Introduction to IPTA Science

  • You can learn more about pulsars by visiting the Australia National National Facility outreach page.
  • A description of gravity, General Relativity, and gravitational waves is available at from NANOGrav, the EPTA, and in an eBook from our friends at gwoptics.
  • Play games like Black Hole Pong and Space Time Quest at the gwoptics games page.
  • While the IPTA is interested in very low frequency gravitational waves, other collaborations, such as LIGO, can search for higher frequency gravitational waves, see the University of Birmingham’s Gravitational Wave group the for more details.

Get Involved and Stay Connected

  • Anyone in the world can help search for pulsars using their home computer by joining the Einstein@Home project.
  • The Australian Pulse@Parkes program introduces students to observing with the Parkes Radio Telescope.
  • The Green Bank Telescope in West Virginia, United States operates the Pulsar Search Collaboratory, which engages high school students and teachers in hands-on research by searching for new pulsars.
  • The University of Texas at Brownsville and the University of Wisconson at Milwaukee operate the ARCC (Arecibo Remote Command Center), which gives students a chance to pursue a variety of projects in radio astronomy.
  • Follow NANOGrav and the EPTA on their Facebook pages.
  • NANOGrav members are releasing a series of YouTube videos and podcasts (available for free from both the NANOGrav website and iTunes) that discuss PTA science topics.
  • The MARIE project at Franklin and Marshall College puts undergraduate students in local classrooms to teach Relativity and other topics related to gravitational wave astronomy.

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